4 Key Behaviors to Consider for Internal Branding – Behavior Matters!
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4 Key Behaviors to Consider for Internal Branding

In the article “Behavioral Science & Graphic Design” we talked about the value of internal branding. 

This focused on the power of branding as a tool to make your communications immediately identifiable and reduce the mental load required to process them. An equally powerful tool is embedding powerful insights into your brand design to drive the behaviors of your audience.

This can be through imagery, color, and carefully thought out themes, copy and reinforcement components. For a great resource on designing with human behavior in mind check out “100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People” by Susan Weinschenk.

Keep reading for some specific insights we use often when working with clients. 

Before applying any specific insights, carefully think about what you are trying to accomplish within your department, what motivations you want to ignite within your employees, and what behaviors you wish to see from them. This will guide what is appropratie for your specific project. 

Here are 4 (of many) key behavioral insights we tap into when creating an internal brand for our clients and why.

  1. Priming – Utilizing subconscious cues to initiate certain behaviors or choices. Define what impact you want your brand to have on your audience and design your brand to initiate their thoughts on those behaviors the moment they see it (this can be achieved with strong messaging, powerful imagery, or subtle cues). Think of it like stereotypes – a preconceived view can impact someone’s perspective even before they even meet someone. In the case of priming, you can use that power for a positive outcome.
  2. Self-schemas – Our views of ourselves and how we should behave in certain circumstances. Engaging your audience’s positive self-schemas can be used to engage the motivations of your audience, prime positive behaviors, and increase their performance.
  3. Ziegarnik Effect – Tasks in process & incomplete tasks employ more mental focus than tasks completed. Use the Ziegarnik effect when you are trying to drive urgency and immediate actions. Use copy and imagery to get your audience to think about what they need to complete ASAP – this is a powerful tool in sales communications.
  4. Idiosyncratic fit – When we feel that we have a unique advantage in a program or that a program is tailored specifically to us we are more motivated to engage and prosper in the program. Make it personal, let them know that you are building programs with their specifics needs in mind and that their opinions matter. Don’t be afraid to ask for something in return!

Every brand is unique and not every concept should be used in every campaign. In fact – many times it’s as important to know which ones NOT to use. The right combination of these insights and more can determine the success of your brand.

Let us help you integrate these into your brand today! Contact us in the form below, or email us at behavior@lanterngroup.com with any issues you are having within your department.

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2 Comments

  1. Tim Houlihan

    These are excellent insights and guideposts to use when creating internal brands. Thanks for sharing!

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